• Mistress Windy Whispers

BDSM Triggers and Dungeon Medical Emergencies

During BDSM play, it is imperative to communicate any known "triggers". That means, if you have any history of abuse, neglect, trauma, PTSD, mental health disorder, or anything else CRAZY, we need to know. Even if you don't think it's a big deal, it can surface in a weird way during an intense BDSM scene.


A BDSM trigger is anything during play that evokes a strong emotional response. Triggers are different for everyone and not everyone has one. There are many different types of triggers including physical, emotional, verbal, touch, sound, or smell. Examples of triggers include impact play would be a trigger because IE belt spanking creates bad association from the past. Especially for women, parts of body being touched or exposed can create negative headspace from embarrassment or issues in the past. Words can be a trigger, for example calling someone a "slut" is ok, but a "bitch" or "whore" is not ok. Humiliation can be a trigger for some, specifically being laughed at or made fun of publicly.


During my experiences as a Domme, I have unintentionally hit triggers with multiple submissives through different types of play. It is never a pleasant experience for either of us and requires a considerable amount of aftercare to be able to process through it all. One of the triggers I've encountered with a submissive has been doing fireplay with a bound submissive who was a military Veteran with PTSD. The fireplay reminded him of an IED going off and smell of burned bodies..... not good. Another trigger was with humiliation ageplay scene when the submissive regressed to 5th grade abusive state and freaked out.


BDSM play can cause repressed memories and emotions to surface. If the emotions are undealt with, it can lead to undesirable behaviors. It's important to try identify these triggers within yourself during play and communicate with your partner. It's always ok to ask to take a break during a play scene if you are feeling bad, confused, foggy, or light headed. There is nothing wrong with safe wording during a scene when something feels off; pay attention to your body.


As a Professional Dominatrix and Licensed Healthcare Provider, I have avoided many medical emergencies in the dungeon by paying attention to my submissive. Everyone is different so you have to assess their baseline and then constantly assess them for changes. It also depends on the scene, for example, if I'm doing breath play, I'm anticipating certain changes to occur. Changes can happen rapidly, so you need to stay on top of it. Also, allow ample time for recovery between transitions.


Warning signs of distress that I pay close attention to are:

  • Their breathing: is it rapid, labored, shallow, deep, low? Pay attention, especially to any sudden changes.

  • Their temperature: sudden change of temperature. People are naturally hot, cold, sweaty, splotchy, or clammy. But sudden body temperature changes get my attention really quick because that means they are about to pass out and need to come down ASAP. Like they start pouring sweat all of a sudden is a huge red flag or they turn pale white.

  • Low blood sugar: many people starve themselves before coming to a session combined with endorphine release is not a good combination and can lead to light headedness or passing out. Eating a light meal is always better than starving yourself. I also have juice and candy on hand at the dungeon, just in case.

  • Numbness: Bondage rotation check every 15 min per extremity, ticking time clock with bondage, especially upright or suspension, unless it's heavy bondage scenes which is much longer time but is usually pre-negotiated.

  • Passing out: Sharp, intense pain (butt plugs) and excitement or getting up too quick after bondage can cause some people to feel light headed and pass out.

  • Changes in their mental status: unable to comprehend what I'm saying or reply back

If any of these things medically concerning happens during a scene, stop the scene immediately, treat the sub. Give them water, a blanket, sit them up, talk to them, re orient them, stop playing. Start administering aftercare. Help them figure out what happened and how this can be avoided next time.



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